Tag Archives: marketing translation

ELIA Networking Days Lyon – in review!


The latest edition of ELIA Networking Days took place in beautiful Lyon. What made the event special was the fact that it was ELIA’s 10th anniversary and it was celebrated accordingly. Amongst other events, the 10th anniversary dinner was held at the Abbaye de Collonges, “powered” by the famous chef Paul Bocuse! The conference itself took place at the Lyon Convention Centre with session rooms providing a beautiful view over the river Rhone and the adjacent park.

Sessions covered lots of topics related to the translation and localization industry, with tracks ranging from Technology to Life Sciences, and from Business Management to Smart Sales. As always, here’s our quick list of takeaways from the event.

  • Clio Schils, in a double session, shared her vast experience and talked about the future of life sciences. Some amazing things are in store for life sciences; M-health is here and taking over! As for LSPs:
    • The higher the risk (of the medical/pharma product etc.), the more documentation there is to be translated.
    • Follow regulatory news if you want to provide some added value service to your clients.
  • Anita Wilson described how to leverage transcreation as a service. A few “tweets” that stood out:
    • Translating “I’m loving it” for McDonalds should cost a lot more than €0.30. Doesn’t it cost tens of thousands just to create the motto?
    • Marketing translation is not a service to be charged on a per word rate.
    • Do you transcreate images? Make sure to replace small boats with big yachts when targeting rich countries!
  • Sabrina Ferrari talked not only about the importance of KPIs but also how to leverage them for marketing and sales purposes. Have you thought of including KPIs in your company collateral? For example, your customer retention rate could be a key selling point!
  • Gerry Lynch described the experience of doing business in the US, lots of interesting (to say the least) stories. Merging with a local company was the best solution he said. And if you are worried about the city you pick, just look if there is competition around. If so, then opportunities are there, as well as resources.
  • Doug Strock provided ideas about diversifying your business. Be careful though not to damage your brand when adding a new service to your portfolio.
  • In a session-turned-workshop, Britta Weber tackled the ever-challenging topic of customer complaints. When a customer complains, your first reaction is important! Talk slowly, say your name, and reduce aggression.
  • Matthias Ceasar provided insight coming from years of personal experience as to the growing pains of an LSP, and what is the perfect size, if there is one. The conclusion? There is no right or wrong, it depends on how you see yourself in the future. “Success comes with maturity and curiosity”.
  • Tony O’Dowd and Jeff Allen – besides providing music during the dinner – pointed out how the cloud provides opportunities to small companies and how minority languages can be leveraged as a business proposition respectively.

Finally, in an inspiring keynote speech, Ralph Blundell addressed the topic of “Ethics as a business differentiator”.

  • Positive stories are your most powerful marketing tool.
  • Nobody really works for the money (!) If you do so you would become a drug dealer!
  • Moderation is necessary: excess is always damaging. There is an optimum size and growth for everything. If only more people applied it in everyday life!

Happy Birthday ELIA and thank you for a wonderful conference! Next ND stop: Krakow, October 1-3, 2015. See you there!


How is transcreation different from translation?


by Effie Salourou, Customer Operations Manager at Commit

Transcreation is a term used by advertising and marketing professionals to refer to the process of adapting a message from one language to another, while maintaining its intent, style, tone and context. A successfully transcreated message evokes the same emotions and carries the same implications in the target language as it does in the source language. Increasingly, transcreation is used in global marketing and advertising campaigns as advertisers seek to transcend the boundaries of culture and language.

Terms with meanings similar to transcreation include “creative translation”, “cross-market copywriting”, “international copy adaptation”, “marketing translation” and “cultural adaptation”. For each of these words and phrases, the thrust is similar: taking the essence of a message and re-creating it in another language or dialect. [1]

But isn’t this what translation is all about? The answer is NO.

Translation and transcreation might be similar processes but they are not identical.

The purpose of translation is the communication of the meaning of a source-language text by means of an equivalent target-language text.[2] A good translation takes into account the vocabulary, grammar, syntax, idiom and local usage of the target audience while remaining faithful to the text, and context, of the original document.

Transcreation expands upon translation by focusing not so much on the literal text, but on taking a concept in one language, and completely recreating it in another, trying to evoke the same feelings and responses to viewers as the original text. Transcreation services also include consultation and feedback on the appearance and the graphic design of a creative message, document, website, campaign ensuring that it is suitable for the target local market.

Transcreation is usually performed by native professional copywriters instead of translators. Copywriters are responsible for telling the story, crafting it in such a way that it resonates with the reader, ideally producing an emotional response. Of course, there are also translators with great experience in marketing translations and have an inclination towards creative writing and they can also be used in transcreation projects.

Like all marketing projects, transcreation starts with a creative brief. The client will have to work very closely with the transcreator and provide very clear ideas regarding the target audience, the purpose of the text and the outcome they want to achieve. Unlike translation, where the linguist is just provided with an original text, in transcreation, the transcreator/copywriter receives a complete creative brief with marketing directions.

Since every project is unique, there is no safe way to say which project categories require transcreation. When such need arises, you should work closely with your translation management team to decide whether your project is a candidate for transcreation or a simple translation would be sufficient to deliver your message in the target language.

[1] Source:Wikipedia

[2] Source:Wikipedia